Category Archives: ctefellow

What Will Students Look Like in 5 Years: Summarizing CTE Fellow

For the 2016-2017 academic year I was chosen as a CTE Faculty Fellow and given the ability to offer workshops and learning experiences for faculty regarding how students would be different in the next 3 to 5 years.

Looking Ahead!: What will students be like in 5 years! How is higher education set to change?

This faculty learning series will focus on what we can expect from students in the next five years.  This would be tied to new employment and technology focuses in common education, which is meant to make students successful and employable and how they will be bringing these experiences and soft skills to higher education.  We will also focus on the new emphases on creativity, entrepreneurship, and problem solving and the skills that students may be bringing to your courses in the near future.

It will focus on a few key areas:

  • How will students use technology and learn differently than they do today?
  • What federal initiatives and programs are being instituted in how students are using technology and being prepared for college?
  • How is higher education changing as to these needs and requirements?
  • How are student expectations of higher education changing?

For my Fellowship, I organized one book club that met four times, had three different speakers and planned one event in September 2017 for a speaker that was not available in Spring.   I worked to partner with different spaces on campus to increase attendance and encourage faculty from other colleges to mingle.

I was impressed by the variety of people from campus that I had attend, and I met a lot of new people that I found attended other events and increased my campus network. Thank you for the opportunity. I learned a lot from the experience and I believe we have enhanced the education environment for our faculty, University students, and community members.

Extended Reach

My philosophy for guest speakers were for any speaker that we used funds to bring to campus, I had events that were more public (could be attended by community members and students) and those closed only to faculty and graduate students at OU. This allowed us to increase our reach and better utilize the limited resources available. We had people attend some sessions from as far away as Clinton Oklahoma.

Additionally, as we were planning the events, I was asked to assist University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma (USAO) in Chickasha, Oklahoma to assist with their innovation and technology grant focused on improving education for Native American Students. They received that grant in Fall and had personnel participate in several of our workshops to provide additional support to other educators in the state, especially those servicing Native American students and thus supported part of the mission of the University of Oklahoma.

Event Title Date
Overview of the Program – What will students look like in 5 years Presented by Dr. Theresa Cullen overviewing trends in both K-12 and higher education related to Technology and 21st Century Teaching and Learning. 9/26/16
Most Likely to Succeed Book Club – Mondays

Lead by Dr. Theresa Cullen – we spent 4 weeks reading the Most Likely to Succeed Book and discussed the use of Problem and Project Based Education in K-12 schools and 21st Century Skills.

10/10/16
Supporting Innovation in a Mobile Device World:  The possibility of App Development in XCode

Speaker Provided by Apple and presented in concert with the OU Innovation Hub. Attended by student and faculty form CS, Education and faculty and staff from OU IT and the Innovation Hub.

11/1/16
Everyone Can Code Initiative

Speaker provided by Apple overviewing how coding is being taught in K-12 and colleges and universities and the resources available. This was a high level overview for faculty held in the Peggy Helmerich Community Classroom in Bizzell library.

11/2/16
Writing Apps Using XCode An Introduction and Resource Sharing

Speaker provided by Apple to have students and faculty learn about App development in the curriculum. Students in both undergraduate and graduate Education and Journalism courses encouraged to attend. 

11/2/16
Tap Into YOUR Creative Mind

Rabbi Michael Cohen did a workshop on sketchnoting and engaging students in creative pursuits as part of teaching to encourage creativity and engagement.  We had many students, USAO faculty, OU faculty and teachers from local schools attend the event.

1/24/17
Design Thinking Workshop

Rabbi Michael Cohen facilitated a Design Thinking workshop that encouraged faculty and graduate students to redesign a part of their course taking student needs in mind. Faculty were very happy with this workshop and felt they had gotten work done that they could apply to their classes immediately. This workshop had a great cross section of campus and people worked with faculty they had not worked with in the past.

1/25/17
Stand by Me  Collaborating and Making as Acts of Empowerment

This presentation offered by Bill Rankin it was open and promoted to the public and talked about how online collaboration enhances education and promotes a global view point.

3/28/17
Lecturing is [not] Dead: Teaching in the Third Information Age

This workshop with Bill Rankin encouraged faculty to think about how they could use technology to enhance engagement in traditional courses.

3/29/17
Learning Outside the Box: Growing an Ecosystem for Learning

This presentation by Bill Rankin  encouraged faculty to think about new ways to engage students. It discussed several theoretical models about levels of engagement including the importance of Community, Content and Context in curricular planning. This was held at the Faculty Scholarship Lab conference room in the Bizzell library.

3/29/17
Redesigning Higher Ed: Starting a New College

Michelle Jones, President and Founder of Wayfinding Academy in Portland Oregon explained how she designed a new college to help students find their purpose.  In this mixed crowd of students and faculty, she also gave ideas of how some of the activities could improve the experience for current students even at a much larger university.

9/28/17
Reaching Students in Their First Year of College: Lessons Learned from Wayfinding Year 1

This presentation by Michelle Jones encouraged faculty and those involved in student services to think about how we can scale up the lessons learned from Wayfinding to better support our students and grow their satisfaction so they will thrive.

9/29/17

Thoughts on the Series: 

I am so fortunate to been afforded this opportunity to work with faculty from across campus. I found the discussions greatly enhanced my view of the University and our mission to serve our students.  I also made connections that I am pretty sure will turn into future collaborations across campus.

Additionally, it allowed me to share what I was reading and thinking about with a larger audience beyond my scholarship and better connect with faculty and staff in student services.  Several students attended the public events and it has allowed me to cement some student relationships which I find very fulfilling..

If I were to do it again, I might engage in a project approach and have faculty showcase their own work. I had wanted to do a faculty, K-12 educator, parent, potential student and current student listening panel to discuss these ideas at the Annual TSI (Teachers Scholar Institute) but due to scheduling and budget cuts, it never materialized.

I hope to have opportunities in the future to do more work with faculty.  I would especially like to do a series on how we can use distance technologies to increase our presence and service within our state.

 

 

Bringing Wayfinding to OK

So for those that know me, you know I have been totally jazzed by the ideas of Wayfinding Academy..  http://www.wayfindingacademy.org 

This is a small startup College in Portland Oregon where students focus on finding their way in their first two years of college through a well scaffolded series of courses that focus on themselves, their community and their goals.   They have the support of mentors and job coaches and are supported in exploring and finding their path – whether that be completing a 4 year degree or doing something else after two years.

Maybe being 42 (almost 43) in the middle of a bit of a mid-life crisis has me thinking – but does college do this anymore?  We spend a lot of time with degree plans and helping students progress but where do we really have them stop and say – what do I bring the world? What do I offer the world?  What do I want to do with my life? And how do these choice impact me, my community and my world?

I know this kind of personalized learning is not scalable to the 1450 freshman that we have this year, but some features are..  So as the final session of my Center for Teaching Excellence Fellow from last year, I am bringing Dr. Michelle Jones the Founder of Wayfinding Academy to come and talk about what she learned. I have three events scheduled.

Thursday night -September 28th –  7:30 is open to the public and will be a general overview of Wayfinding. Room 334 in Collings Hall (College of Education)

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/redesigning-higher-ed-starting-a-new-college-tickets-37765380269?utm_source=ALL+CTE+-+2017+Fall&utm_campaign=969a9bff85-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_08_28&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_a64c99c505-969a9bff85-109029393

 

Friday Morning – September 29th – 9am -10:30 – The Library Community Room – (the one with the glass by the Bookmark) This will be a special session for faculty on Lessons Learned in the first year of Wayfinding.  There are things that we can learn and use for retention!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/reaching-students-in-their-first-year-of-college-lessons-learned-from-wayfinding-year-1-tickets-37765571842?utm_source=ALL+CTE+-+2017+Fall&utm_campaign=969a9bff85-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_08_28&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_a64c99c505-969a9bff85-109029393

 

Friday at 4:30 -6:00  We are having an informal meet and greet at Yuyu’s Cozy Cafe (408 Main street – used to be The Screen Door (parking is easy in their own lot and we are using the private room in the back) We will sample their new food too.

Here is the facebook event with more details:

https://www.facebook.com/events/273842419780212/?acontext=%7B%22action_history%22%3A[%7B%22mechanism%22%3A%22bookmarks%22%2C%22surface%22%3A%22bookmarks_menu%22%2C%22extra_data%22%3A%22[]%22%7D%2C%7B%22surface%22%3A%22dashboard%22%2C%22mechanism%22%3A%22calendar_tab_event%22%2C%22extra_data%22%3A%22[]%22%7D]%2C%22ref%22%3A46%2C%22source%22%3A2%7D

Thursday night  and Friday afternoon is open to anyone.. I hope some people from K-12 and higher education and maybe some interested parents will take the opportunity to join me in learning more.

 

I hit my 20 blog posts

So one of my goals for summer was to blog more.. and while I thought I would blog more than I did.. I did hit 20 posts today that I  am counting (this is 21)

I was blogging for for a few purposes

  1. To get in the habit of more regularly daily writing again.
  2. To create content that could be used to promote our IPT programs like the 21st Century masters http://bit.ly/21stcenturyteaching 
  3. To interact more deeply with my followers on Twitter and in the ADE Community.
  4. To better communicate the issues that I care about online.

So those were my intended purposes and here are the unintended benefits I found.

  1. More meaningful interaction with alumni – I have had several reach out to me after a blog posts and without advertising the blog, people are liking what they read.
  2. Better interaction with people at OU – There are several people at OU who regularly blog  including Adam Croom, Keegan Long Wheeler, Laura Gibbs who I have had longer conversations and interactions with since I have blogged.
  3. Documentation of my time.  For example – i spent a lot of time in the innovation hub – the posts that I made on the innovation hub have been great for me to document my time and show what I have been up to.
  4. Sharing my learning – the blog has provided me with a great place to share my learning that I will use with my students.  It allows me to be more vulnerable to them and share where I struggle.
  5. It has helped me work out some ideas in a rough form.  Next week I am doing a Ignite session at IPadPaloozaOU  (http://ipadpaloozaOU.weebly.com) This 5 minute talk is based on a blog post called A file called Dammit.

Overall, I am finding that blogging is an important part of my practice and something that I will be continuing. Much like research though, there are more things that I want to blog about than I have time to.. I have a list of to do’s and a few drafts hanging out.

Just like any creative practice, we have to learn how to manage our time and do it.. but overall this has been a valuable experience.

I want to give a shout out to OUCreate – because probably if the tool was not provided and I did not feel guilty about developing mine more as I ask students to.. I would probably not have done it.

 

Blending Leadership – My reaction

So I always try to read something to get me thinking over spring break..  (I was not good about blogging last year but I read Most Likely To Succeed by Tony Wagner and College Unbound by Selingo – books I suggest to everyone)

So this spring break I read Blending Leadership by Reshan Richards and Stephen J. Valentine.

First, I should say that I know Reshan through Apple Distinguished Educators – we have worked on a few projects at the same time but don’t know each other very well.  He is well known for his company Explain Everything but I will say by reading this book, I have definitely developed a great respect for him, his blended perspective (industry, K-12 and higher education). 

He was talking about this book in Summer 2017 at ADE Institute and I bought it online but never read it but picked it up as my spring break book. I am really glad I did. 

The overall premise of the book.. is that modern leadership requires us to think about leading in both the face to face and virtual world and that acts of servant leadership exist in online too.   I took notes as  I read the book, so it may seem kind of stream of consciousness but let me share some big ideas.

Truly Blended Scholarship

What struck me first about this book was truly the blended leadership and blended information seeking that is both spoken about in the book and practiced in it. In a higher education position being active on Twitter and interacting with blogs is not rewarded valued and questioned from any of the reasons that are discussed in the book (no peer review, no editing). 

However this is how I learned much of what I do, and my Professional Learning Community is in Blogs and Twitter So I was really excited when I saw that kind of reading combined with the reading that I do and the people that I know including Anne Ottenbreit Leftwich, Peggy Ertmer and wCharles Graham, people that I know professionally or went to grad school with.  These are well respected educational technologists and the authors of this book did a great job of weaving peer reviewed research articles with writings from business, and even blog posts. (I personally loved that they talked about the Agile Manifesto as I got my SCRUM certification this summer)   This book is very appropriate for someone who’s a professor in Education who is also engaging in the PLN that teachers are.  In fact I am going to encourage some of our educational readers to read this book to think about their role in both face to face and online spaces as leaders. This book is great and perhaps necessary read as we rethink scholarship and its value in academia.. This book provides a good example that someone can be engaging in reading peer reviewed scholarship but can also be informed by blogs. Which I personally feel are growing in importance as I have had “albatross” articles that have taken years to publish while their findings leak relevancy as each month passes by.

Practice what you Preach –

There was a lot in this book about the behaviors and habits of effective leaders in the digital age.   Some of the better ones included:

Be open in your communication and share your personal networks when it matches shared interest.. (Ie.. Don’t tweet a bunch of stuff on High School calculus to your network if it is all kindergarten teachers – but totally cool to talk about human development as it affects all ages.. (My example)

Be open with your tech use and share your experiences and be a participant leader working collaboratively with your team. (ie.. practice what you teach)

Consider taking care of digital spaces as servant leadership – ie.. if you would not let trash sit in a hallway, why would you let a Google Doc become unwieldy with comments and strikethroughs.

On being a flexible leader and tech user

Don’t get caught up on the tools for one purpose – remain flexible and know that the tool you love today could be gone tomorrow.    Use the tools, but we willing to pivot if something better comes along or it not longer meets your needs.

I totally love how they deal with SAMR – it drives me nutty that people use it as a ranking for teachers, when it was not intended to be that way..  I always think about it as varied stimulus. We all had teachers who used worksheets all the time, and never let you create something, and another teacher who was all into creation, that you never got through content.   There is a balance, where scaffolded learning helps learners learn both facts but also apply them and create with them.

Overall Takeaways

A blended leader is open and flexible and pays attention to the people they work with and allow them opportunities to grow and lead. They maintain online spaces to free people up to be creative and productive.

They also unplug when needed – being online is a choice and people are still key to the process.

Blended leaders choose the use of technology when it serves them well and are intentional to promote their organizations and their organization’s mission.  I really loved how they talked about companies that we love for their clear communication of their mission and how they asked – why aren’t schools doing more of that?  There are some really good ideas how every teacher or faculty member can participate in this mission.(which is a growing shadow work required of faculty in these rough budget times)

(on a related note: I LOVED reading this as a purchase from the IBooks Store.. I was able to highlight and transfer my highlights to Notes easily which made writing this blog post easy (even when I was on a plane or without network connectivity)  I only wish my highlighted sections could be more easily shown as complete – but I love that it will align them to printed page numbers.

Also I read this book in about 5 hours – in two sittings – a quick read and very useful.

Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itun.es/us/D6epdb.l

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment to Create Innovators or even Innovative Professors?

Again, I am responding to my student responses on Creating Innovators: (its kind of stream of consciousness but reading these books always gets me trying to make connections)

The first thing that strikes me about this book is that some of the politics that are going on with schools and even in the country are a question of innovation.   Is our education system about tests? or is our education system about creating opportunities for students to be innovative and finding new ways to assess them?   Should our assessments be about growth or benchmarks?  Should one assessment lead into the next project?

In the end, I found a lot of my individual comments to student responses being about assessment – because in the end that is the issue. If we allow students to define their own problems, what is the assessment? How can we show that they learned?  How do we avoid falling into that trap where everyone gets the “college of ed” clap because they met the minimum requirements. How do we drive students to go beyond where they are comfortable?
I would say that we need to look at assessment in new ways.  Is there such a thing as a participatory assessment? Yes, there are books written on them, but in practice there are not good guidelines.   They are very prevalent in business.  We ask people all the time to assess themselves, often in business before a raise or an annual evaluation, we ask people to do a self -assessment.   However, this activity has to be really scaffolded.

Looking at Assessment through my own Assessment as a Professor

Let me share an illustrative from my life as a professor.   We are currently doing faculty reviews, and I can talk about my own self assessment – instead of it being a truthful reflective goal setting experience, I will admit that mine is a whiny, justification, excuse riddled piece of work.. (My evals were not as a high as I would like because I was teaching too many classes.. etc.. )  However, in our own faculty reviews, we are not rewarded for honest reflection, and our responses are not reviewed from year to year.   And they should be. The assessment is structured to be an one time measure, and they don’t lead to any feedback on future projects and are not part of a holistic review.  Part of the reason, is  the prompt is backward facing and it is not guiding me to set new goals, celebrate successes and failures and talk about how I will become better in the coming year(s).  It is also focused on the professor as an individual not a community member and does not require 21st century staples to be highlighted such as collaboration, mentorship, empathy, celebrating failure.

So our current prompt is:

In light of the information provided in this annual report, please assess your contributions in the three areas of professorial responsibility. Include any factors or information Committee A should consider as it reviews your work in research, service, and teaching.

It is just screaming out for me to make a whiny justification – the prompt is incorrectly scaffolded.. 

What is we had a prompt like this instead: (3 parts for the 3 parts of my job – scholarship, teaching and service)

Given your last year as reported in this document,  where do you see your career going in the next year or 5 years?  Where are finishing projects and where are you laying groundwork for future work… (ie.. what are excited to be learning about and want to spend more on next year).  Where do you plan to spend your scholarly time in the next year? 

As a teacher,  how are you committed to students in formal and informal ways and where would you like to see to our students be in 1 year or 5 years. What are you doing or plan to do to help make that dream a reality? 

As a citizen, how are you contributing to our community?  How are you supporting others, their interests, and working to create a working and learning environment that will continue to grow, flourish and support its learners and fellow faculty and staff? 

Then I will be revolutionary – besides those awful evals with the bubble sheets – when do we ask students to evaluate us?  What if we triangulated (Yeah, I know using my own professional tools to assess myself) and shared my personal statement about my commitment to students with some…  … wait for it…   STUDENTS ..  Check to see if what I think I am doing, is perceived that way, and find out if students feel supported and mentored.. (Yep Participatory assessment)..

Now those of you that have ever touched a faculty review, then thinks.. are you kidding?  Do you know long those things take? Maybe the question is not do crappy reviews yearly, but meaningful, deep reviews every 3 years.  Faculty could be on a cycle (like post tenure reviews) where they do it every few years and prompts like this scaffold goal setting, reflection on their goals and the mission of the institution, and job satisfaction.

So hopefully from this example, you can see how scaffolding makes all the difference – so in the end good assessment comes back to the prompts and how we get students (or faculty) to think about the work they did.

Why scaffolded reflective assessment matters

I realize I got a little off my topic talking about faculty reviews, but honestly, don’t we want our faculty to grow as much as we want our students to. People engaged in meaningful work, are great colleagues, and raise the organization to new levels.

Now think about this – how could we frame questions for students to get them to be forward looking, self reflective, and use the assessment on one project to set their goals for the next one – what would that look like?  And how could we get community feedback on projects and make it participatory assessment?

My post show that good assessment is as important for the teachers/faculty as it is for the students – and in the end innovators are not inventors – instead they are people who are using creativity and critical thinking to engage in their environment every day.   This kind of thinking drives them forward and makes them better.

 

 

 

Participated in my first Zoom Chat

 

Tonight I participated in my first Zoom Chat. I was not familiar with this tool and were some things that I really liked and some things I did not..

This was the event on Accessibility

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sevenzo-live-chat-accessibility-inclusion-social-justice-tickets-30890940635?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=estw&utm-source=tw&utm-term=listing

My experiences with Zoom

All speakers and participants were featured on the same level.  This inclusion made me feel really required to participate – and I had to be logged in and engaged. (This would be different than Firetalk where everyone presenting is at the top and users must use chat)

  1.  I was able to easily mute and unmute myself.
  2. My internet was not great, but I was easily able to both talk and type.
  3. Sound was good.
  4. Every participate was able to screen share – so for teaching it would be good.

I think the Zoom Meeting is a good possible solution for some of our online learning needs. From the participant end it was easy to use and even though I was on a sketchy connection, worked well and was easy to use.

The price was not bad, 14.99 a month to host up to 50 people. Also all chats could be downloaded to be archived.

https://www.zoom.us/pricing/?zcid=1291&gclid=CjwKEAiA79zDBRCgyf2FgeiY-CESJABzr0BMqlmOOpccps-8FnhTaGz3e4pe424zQ7Uo09Bl_4YHthoCNhXw_wcB

I spoke with some others who participated and they talked that they found it more reliable than Google Hangouts.    Since the talk I was attending was on Accessibility, I wonder if Zoom is more accessible than other tools? and what affordances it offers.

 

For the Program at OU that is looking for a blended approach,  Zoom might be a good solution.

 

Upcoming CTE Fellow Workshop: Creativity in the Classroom

I am working with the Center for Teaching Excellence as part of the CTE Faculty Teaching Fellows..

The theme of my series is what will our students look like in 5 years – how do we need to change to be ready for them.. We have two upcoming presentations with one guest speaker that you can be part of..

Tuesday January 24th – we are having a public lecture at 7:15 PM in Room 334 in the Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education..

 

Rabbi Michael Cohen is known in K-12 circles for his workshops on creativity and sketchnoting.  He will give us all (both K12 and Higher Education) insight on how we can better reach students by incorporating creativity in the classroom.

Read more about him at:  http://thetechrabbi.com/

He is going to do a 1 hour workshop on involving creativity in teaching.

Tap Into YOUR Creative Mind

We are all creative, some artists, musical, and almost everyone even those who can barely get out a stick figure are visual learners. Come learn about how visual learners can be supported through creative projects, especially sketchnoting. Learn the creative end, the research, and most of all come ready to have fun!

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 | 7:15 PM – 8:15 PM
Room 334 in Collings Hall

If you will attend – please register here: (this will help plan for seating and deliver any parking information).

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tap-into-your-creative-mind-tickets-31064940072

Why this workshop for the CTE Fellow Program 

More and more students are finding the ability to incorporate creativity in their learning.  When they come to OU – will they be hitting a wall and forced back into traditional teaching methods?  Rabbi Michael Cohen motivates and inspires teachers to find ways to incorporate creativity in the classroom – and by understanding what students are doing before college – you can tap those experiences in your classroom projects.

Questions for section 3 of Most Likely to Succeed

In Part three -the Millenial story – I would agree that a college degree is very much about the network – do we do a good job of establishing the skills or scaffold the network for all students?

Are they right about teacher education? How can we improve it if they are?

How do value student created projects more? and assess?

is our current focus at OU supporting the new or old model of education?

Is competency based education the answer?

Tweeting about CTE Fellow

I am going to be tweeting and posting about my CTE Fellow  Looking Ahead!: What will students be like in 5 years? How is higher education set to change?

If you don’t have time for a Book Study but want to follow the kinds of topics we are talking about, you can follow this blog http://drterriou.com  or follow me on twitter or the hashtag #CTEFellow.

There is a handy widget on this blog to follow the hashtag as well.

I hope that will engage with the discussion about how students will change.

Why Twitter?

Twitter is a great way to curate your content and share with others and to find out what teachers – both in common ed and higher education are talking about. Many educators are using it as a place to discuss. By using a hashtag, you can easily search it and curate it. All posts that I make about this topic will be Hashtagged #CTEFellow.