Category Archives: edtech

We got interviewed on BadgeChatK12

So I got interviewed on BadgeChatK12 broadcast about our use of badges in our preservice technology integration classes.

You can see it here:

 

We did it a little on the fly – I asked if any of my students in the morning class wanted to participate and I got 1 yes – From Brody Smith.. We were far from rehearsed but it is an interesting conversation.  We will practice more in the future so we share the time better!

Noah Geisel – is a badge pioneer who organizes BadgeSummit right before ISTE (day before). It was the highlight of my conference last year so I definitely encourage you to consider going in Chicago. http://badgesummit.weebly.com/ (here is last year’s link)

Noah interviewed us about using badging in preservice teacher education and the who what when where and why of it.. I am proud of what we are working on and how using badges allows busy working students to create flexible learning experiences.   the chat really helped me see where we need to go.

Participating in this chat was a very reflective process for me.  First, It got me to think about how we can bolster the project by involving administrators from local schools in the process as endorsers.  Second, it helped me to think about how I should be teaching more about badging in general – ie.. I have not been getting students to consider if they will use badging themselves and more about the equity side of badging.   Third, I see that we need to provide even more choice – so students pick 16 badges from a list of 22 or so.. versus having to do all 16.   After the interviewing, I will look for outside endorsers of the badges and increase readings.

it was a little scary to talk about what we are doing – because I know that we are newbies in the badge process.  People like Rick West have been doing badging for a long time. However it is important for all levels of implementation to have a voice..  Hopefully people who heard us talk about badging which is about a year old -will be willing to investigate it and consider trying it themselves.

 

Please comment on this post with your ideas after you watch it.. How could we better use badging in Preservice teacher education.

 

Celebrating PreService Teacher Questions

This week the @oueducation students in my technology integration course took over the #OklaEd Chat. I moderated but a lot of my students attended and asked so many questions. They are hungry to know more about being a teacher and twitter provided a good forum to get those questions out and facilitate class discussion.

How did we pick the questions?

We used tricider to have all questions suggested and then we used the top 7 (we combined a few to get most of the questions out)  Tricider is a tool for brainstorming that I learned through some of my work with ISTE.  it worked well in this context. Students put up their questions and then had a few days to vote on top questions.  The key to using tricider is time to vote and formulate orginal ideas – and those two times being separate.

Here is our tricider page:   http://www.tricider.com/admin/2U6wQfYb9mN/8ImVNecpgeP

The OklaEd Chat

The chat was frenetic..so many side questions.  Our students had a bunch of questions, and wanted them answered – and Oklahoma educators were great at doing that.  To see the actual chat transcript visit:  https://www.participate.com/transcripts/oklaed/5e8404ef-1988-4c62-98df-1c31b225c885

Also it was featured on OklaSaid by Scott Haselwood and Erin Barnes.  This podcast dives deeper into the issues.  http://teachingfromhere.com/podcast/episode-37-future-teachers-want-to-know/ 

In addition, we did a follow up activity that was a bust at first, but now has seemed to be valuable for those that got replies – I created a @Flipgrid for our students to post questions and then to have teachers answered. I had a few rock stars that answered a bunch, and they made it work.. but overall it was a bit of a bust because teachers are busy and I did not have that many answers.

https://flipgrid.com/32585d

I loved how the flipgrid showed a little picture of who had replied.

So here is what I learned from this experiment.

  1. Giving students forums to ask “real life” teachers questions is great and necessary.
  2. Find a group to get more engaged in answering – if I did this again – i would get up front agreement and not spring it on them.  (ie.. maybe a graduate class or a teacher organization).
  3. I got several several alumni to engage – which was great and helped me to foster greater alumni connections (which can be important for placement, recruiting, and to support projects as well as the alumni themselves).
  4.  Pay attention to the questions preservice teachers ask, it tells us a lot about their fears and what we project.  Most students asked about work life balance, workload, and getting a job.  This is what is on their radar and we should consider this in student teaching and first year supports. And also know that they are hearing how terrible teaching is, we need to celebrate the great parts of the job, like #TeachLikeMe and other movements.
  5. I got replies from all over the country, even people I did not know. I love how supportive the teacher community is.. but I wonder if my students get that just yet.
  6. I need to better define student roles and have them do more of the leg work in the future..  I still moderated with student created questions/tiles  but I think next time, it will be better to have a committee of students to run it.
  7. The class discussions after the chat were great. We shifted through answers that concerned them…(like stay away from Pinterest) and helped make sense of them.  It was a valuable discussion for students who participated and who did not.

Not all of the students appreciated it, but those that “got it” really made great direct connections to teachers. I have to remind myself that not all students are developmentally ready to truly participate in the teacher community – but that for those that are, its a wonderful experience.  For many others, it is an early exposure to the field and teaching community and as they grow, they will know places to find it in the future.

For the future, I may reach out and see if we can do this as part of the #TeachLikeMe movement in spring.   This would be a great way to involve Preservice teachers in the recruitment of future teachers and give #TeachLikeMe involved teachers a way to communicate their message.

 

 

 

Get FIT Handouts

So I am bit behind, so all of my handouts for Get FIT are found here:

 

Using Clips to Accommodate (1-42) Learn about Apple Teacher  (3-39), Content Creation to Mix up Literacy (4:42)

I hope you enjoy these one page handouts and use them to launch your students into new projects.

Congrats on going 1 to 1 and Look forward to learning with you.

Here are the handouts:

GetfitCullen

Here are each handout by itself

literacy only

Clips Only

Apple Teacher Only

Spending Time in the Schools

So Monday and Tuesday I cancelled class and took my students instead to local schools.  I am so thankful to the relationships that I have with local educators to be able to do it.  I have to say arranging these kinds of group visits -gosh logistically it is hard! but totally worth it.

Students spent their class time during the week attending a school and observing how they were using technology.  On Monday we went to Norman North High School and Tuesday we attended the Showcase at Arthur Elementary in Oklahoma School.  Arthur is a Connect Ed School who received a grant from Apple so all students were given an iPad and teachers received a ton of Professional development.

Here are some pictures and some of of what the students did..

Chris Kalinsky – Apple Distinguished Educator and iTeam leader for Norman North High School  lead our tour of the new beautiful school.       

About 20 students attended.

Peter Leisenfeld spent a lot of time talking to students about preparing for their jobs.

The Norman North faculty and staff were amazing in supporting our students. Several teachers took time out of their day to talk to us including the librarians and Principal Dr. Pete Leisenfeld.

On Tuesday,  we took a group to Arthur Elementary – This a ConnectED School.

Students were proud to show us their work.

Principal Dr. Rhonda Schroeder took time throughout the day to talk to students to both get feedback and share her leadership philosophy.

The special education team took time to talk to your our special education students during her prep time.

 

We got to see our 2017 grad  Tessa Turnbull teaching which was great for my students. 

Carrie Price, a current graduate student in our ILAC program, taught how to create presentations in Keynote using shapes.  Something I had just seen THIS week in the Apple Teacher newsletter.  They are doing things quickly there.

 

So why is this sooooo important? 

I am finding more and more that we need to get our students into schools more.  By attending as a large group, yes, we don’t get an authentic experience but we get a shared experience that we can talk about for the rest of the semester.

My students got to see schools in two different stages of technology integration.  Norman is starting a new initiative, Arthur is 3 years in – those are very different an provide great opportunities for discussion and comparison.

The most meaningful interactions were between teachers and administrators with students. They got to see different philosophies and what they shared gave “street cred” to my curricular choices.  This is especially true when students saw the different technologies we use in use in the classroom.

So what does it do for me as a professor? 

Spending more time in classrooms helps me to keep my technology skills limber and relevant.  Let me give a great example. Many of the teachers were using Classroom app to control the iPads at Arthur.  When Classroom first came out, it was not compatible with how we do not manage our iPads.  So Barry took a few minutes to show me the update and get me up to speed. I am changing what I am teaching next week to demo this in class.  It is also really important for students to see that I have relationships with teachers and administrators.  I work really hard to make sure what we do is relevant and updated and I think this visit helps to establish that..

I really wish I could spend more time in schools.   I have often been jealous of friends who work at PDS schools and get to embed in the K-12 environment.  Interacting with teachers every day, is a lot of fun and we need to do more of it in Higher education.

 

I got to sneak peek at a new book and I liked it!!!

So I know Monica Burns as a speaker from our iPadpaloozaOU conference in 2016 and 2017 and through the ADE program.  I generally know her in only a professional capacity.

She recently asked me if I would be willing to do a review of her book coming out next week, no pressure but if I would be willing to write a review of it.  And honestly, I felt no pressure and approached it as if I were looking at for use with my preservice teachers.

First, let me say that I was complimented.  I have reviewed books before in the pre-publication phase but never been given an opportunity to endorse a book or not..   I have copies of some of Monica’s other books and I find them to be very practical and applied, which can be a great compliment when paired with more empirical readings as part of teacher education or professional development course for current teachers.  Students seem to be really motivated by these hands-on books because they are wondering how it is done in the real world and inservice teachers are looking for ideas that are well justified and tied to curricular goals.

Much like when one is asked to review someone’s tenure dossier and you realize they are “good” .. I breathed a sigh of relief when I saw the pre-publication copy of Monica’s Book Tasks before Apps and realized it was REALLY GOOD!  So I was comfortable endorsing and could see using it with my preservice teachers or in my spring graduate course where I always have students read one professional book in addition to research articles.

So the book is called Tasks before Apps

https://www.amazon.com/Tasks-Before-Apps-Designing-Tech-Rich/dp/141662466X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1507250532&sr=1-1&keywords=tasks++monica+burns

This book deals with a problem that I have long felt in Ed Tech. The idea that we have to keep chasing the new popular app and forget all about what we were wanting kids to do in class.  Tech without content or without a sound rationale for using it.. (ie.. is it assessment? will it help students to explain? Will it engage additional communication channels or ways of explaining?)   A perfect example of this problem is whiteboard apps.. I see teachers all the time that really have mastered something like Educreations but then hear that Explain Everything is “better” and abandon their workflow and process to use the “better” app.  Both of these apps have their pros and cons but the most important factor is a teacher who knows them well and uses them comfortably with their students –  and even more importantly has their students create things with them to achieve a meaningful classroom task (explanation, assessment, presentation, communication, etc..)

Additionally, Tasks before Apps  focuses on having students using tools in content creation – which matches my philosophy and is where I see educational technology needing to go.. We need to get past teacher productivity and move to concrete examples of students creating things with technology to show their understanding.  We also need to make more examples available to teachers of how this can be done to both generate ideas and opportunities to discuss and critique actual use cases.

Finally this book has real example of how you could use different tools in the classroom in a meaningful way. I especially liked that it dealt with different grade levels. I love teaching an educational technology class, but sometimes wish my early childhood, elementary, and secondary students were in different sections – because rarely are there examples for all grade levels.

I am going to consider using this book as the practice book for my Teaching with Technology graduate class this spring (I always pick one book that is under $30 that might be read as a book group for PD)  and perhaps in the future for my undergraduate course.

When we think of our service role to our field, I think looking at new books and helping to curate content is an important role for us as professors to play. We have the opportunity to review resources both open resources and affordably priced resources that could help our future teachers generate ideas, critique and feel supported in the classroom.  I enjoyed this opportunity and look forward to other opportunities to share my expertise in the future.

So I think I have an endorsement on the book, (haven’t seen it yet, but Monica Tweeted my comment out) but happy to endorse. I think this would be a good book for preservice teachers or for a book study in a district. You might want to check Tasks before Apps out.

Tasks Before Apps: Designing Rigorous Learning in a Tech-Rich Classroom

 

 

 

 

A new Approach to a Research Poster

So on Thursday, I am presenting at the Rocky Mountain Educational Research Association Annual Meeting in Lawton and I am presenting my work as a poster on the Teacher Flight Project.

So I will be honest, when I heard I got a poster, I swore a little and thought, dang it now i have to make a poster. And on conferences where I need to fly, I often leave them at the site and after all that work only a few people see them.

I am trying something new, for this conference, I made a series of 4 Infographics using Pictochart. This an interactive infographic maker that will allow users to interact with my data.

Why did I try this new approach? 

Since i am studying teachers leaving Oklahoma and I recruited through social media, I want to share my results in these same venues. I also want to create ways to share the research with leaders in our state.  Infographics are the way to do that. Also the data is more interesting, if you can interact with it, rather than a static image – so the Piktochart graphics allow me to do that.  I can also print out the graphics and place them on the poster board like any other poster.

I think this is the best of both worlds, so I will be able to share my results at the conference and with a wider audience through social media.

I will be sharing my graphics as I present on Thursday so please come back to it. The direct link will be http://bit.ly/okteachers  but it will be on this blog.

Looking forward to interacting with you and the conference attendees later this week.

Teachers are Paid too much, right??

So as we speak, the Governor has called a special session to require legislators in Oklahoma to fix the budget that is more messed up due to the Cigarette tax debacle.  https://www.sanditepride.com/local-news/170922-legislature

So one of the items on their agenda is a teacher pay raise.. and I definitely agree .. that it is long overdue. As we have fallen quickly to last in the nation for teacher pay, and far below our region, we needed to act on this years ago..

However, one of the arguments is that teachers are paid too much.  they only work 8 to 3 and they have the summers off..

Seriously?  Then they must not know teachers…

So let me show you what I see right now in my @OUeducation College of Education. There are about 50 teachers in our building today who have already spent 5 days in summer and many who have

driven 3 hours or more to learn about teaching coding using the Code.org curriculum. They will meet one weekend every quarter for the rest of the year to continue their learning.  They are not being reimbursed, but they are are here because they care about the future of Oklahoma and want to learn more to be better teachers.

This is not the exception to the rule, this is what teachers do, they do professional development, often on their own dime to make themselves better teachers and advance our state forward. 

Our lunch conversation was not idle chitchat, it was how can we move our state forward and keep us from falling behind.  These educators are concerned and working hard to do whatever they can do to make it a reality at least in their own classroom or school.

So let me say, if that is the conversation that teachers are having when they give up their weekend to learn more to advance our state,  I better be hearing the same kind of conversations by our  Oklahoma legislators. What decisions do we need to make now to advance our state and keep us from falling behind further??!!

Legislators, if you are unsure what are some things we can do, then go to a local school and ask a teacher. They work every day to ensure Oklahoma’s future – no matter their politics. And they deserve to be paid appropriately since they are future of Oklahoma.  

Quit Insulting Teachers

I am pretty unimpressed with some recent articles from the New York Times on Education, and this one is not an exception: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/02/technology/silicon-valley-teachers-tech.html 

This article outlines how teachers who participate in ambassador programs are as a bad as doctors that prefer drugs that were promoted through free lunches. How Insulting!

I was insulted by the article on multiple levels.   First, teachers are intelligent professionals and they can make intelligent choices (I know this is the doctor argument).. but how they came to the technology they promote is not accurately represented.

For example, I am not a FlipGrid ambassador but I could see doing it.. Why, I explored a free trial of the software and it filled an educational need.
Have I told other teachers about it? You betcha!!!
Did I need someone to give me a t-shirt to promote to others – No.. because I am a professional that understands how people learn and the transformative power of technology, so I made an instructional choice that I am jazzed about.    I tell others about it because it works for my classroom and I am excited about what it does.

There are lots of programs that I tell people about:  Flipgrid,  Twitter, Explain Everything, BookCreator, Clips, Adobe Spark Suite, Canva, CoSpaces, Remind, Doink GreenScreen, Code.org. Swift Playground, Botball Robotics and Badgelist etc..  Am I member of any of these promotional programs? No, because I am lucky enough to have the resources of a University and I am not starved or completely reliant on my own funds to get tech for my class. (But I do spend a bunch of my own money – for example I paid for Flipgrid because the paperwork was not worth my time).  I have rejected technologies and do it all the time – because I am a knowledgeable professional and can make choices.

But here is the big point of this- I care about the education of children and college students – and you insult me to think that I quit being a professional when someone gives me a sticker and all judgement flies out the window when someone gives me an endorsement.  I am a professional, a thinking and  ethical professional.   Educators are professionals.

We are starving our teachers, so yes, some of them are pimping themselves out for t-shirts and stickers so that they can get access to the tools that they know work well with kids and helps to supplement their curriculum.  I would consider being an ambassador for access to some of the free professional development they get.  Some of these ambassadors are great member of my professional learning network – (PLN) and they show me things about these tools that help me be a better teacher – things they sometimes learned through the access of the ambassador programs.

As far as being an Apple Distinguished Educator – the article has it backwards.  It is not an ambassador program, and I did not join it to get free Apple stuff.. I was doing Apple stuff and I joined it to get the ability to make the Apple stuff I was using better, interact with the development teams, and work with other educators that are doing amazing things. (They do talk about this)  There are Apple fanboys in the group, but honestly there are real conversations about workflow and what works best.. (which is not always Apple products). I know there are Apple people who tire of my criticism and critique.   I am insulted that the article infers that by being part of this group I have lost my ethical compass. Let me be clear,  I am part of this community to make my teaching and student experience better – through my learning and advanced knowledge.  This was a very ethical choice!

The way that we fund our schools has created this ethical dilemma. If we continue buying devices and then said – you can’t get any apps or programs for them, we force our teachers to be creative and try to get what their students’ need in different ways. From the Tulsa teacher panhandling for school supplies to the constant barrage of teachers asking for copy paper on Donors Choose – we have cut these professionals off at their knees. They know what is best for kids, because they are trained educators, and in our deficit educational economy, I too would get a free program if I wore their t-shirt a few times. If you don’t want teachers to have hustle and be scrappy- then fund them fully and provide them with a rich environment where they continue to learn and are free to innovate themselves.  Right now we are not doing that.

We need to trust our teachers to use their best judgement and we need to allow them to explore the professional tools available to them – like any educated career. Back to the Doctor argument – we don’t keep Doctors from prescribing other drugs, but they may not have the time to fully explore them.  What we see with teachers, is that they having to hustle to provide the basic classroom resources, if we supported them appropriately,  with both the tools, resources and time – they too could have more tools available in their pedagogical toolkit to help all learners learn.

In the end, the ethical dilemma is ours as a society and community.  We have the power to support and fund teachers and they deserve our respect, support and thanks -each and every day!

 

Using Apple Distinguished Educator Books in Preservice Teacher Education

So I have been asked by local schools to quit teaching smartboard.  I am on the fence about this because my ed tech classes are a mix of Early childhood, elementary and secondary students.  So this semester, I instead made smartboard a choice, not a requirement and we will see how that goes.

Instead I made interactive whiteboard apps a requirement.  (they have been for several years) but I have always struggled to think of a way to have students use them in a meaningful way and not waste important content time.  Also, slimming smartboard bought me more coding time, a chance to visit our connect ed school in OKC, and more time for interactive whiteboards.

  • Previous Attempts:
    I have had them make tutorials (snoozeville) and then it also only focuses on the tech not content.
  • Last year I tried to have them report on Horizon report and the National Ed tech plan – and that was problematic for two reasons. Dry content and then they tried to use the IWB as powerpoint -which they are not..

So I had to redesign the assignment again.  Additionally, on my evaluations, I always have complaints about not doing enough allow enough content choices (ie.. secondary want to do secondary, early childhood want early childhood etc..) And all my students have iPads so how do I do it?

This summer I realized I was not using a great resource – the Apple Distinguished Educator Books available in the iBooks store.  They can be hard to search for but there is way to link to them.
https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewMultiRoom?cc=us&fcId=1107473595&mt=11

This listing gets you to all the books that have been published by Apple Distinguished Educators where they associated it with their account.   These are stories from the classroom,  of how they are using Apple tools in the classroom and different Apps.

So to teach interactive whiteboards, I divided students up into groups and assigned them a interactive whiteboard ish app (Baiboard, Notability, Explain Everything, Educreations, ShowMe,  Paper by 53, and NearPod)  Then I let them pick any book from this list.. It was great because they triaged the books for me and could share with their classmates a few that are really good.

Lessons Learned
I am pretty happy with the assignment, they picked things they liked and were able to demo the apps well. I learned some new tricks in different apps and students were creative in using the tools.   They also had strong opinions which is what I wanted them to have so they can influence choices as a teacher by their school.

They needed more than 10 minutes for sure to present though.  I need to also add a youtube tutorial watching requirement (I could tell the groups that knew the apps better than others). Finally, I need to make a dibs google doc. ( Ie.. I need to have people call “Dibs” on a book), because after three classes, Bea Leiderman, I love ya, but if I see the Aphid story one more time, I am going to wig out.  So not allowing a duplicate book is more for me than anyone else.  Also, I could have directed them towards some that I really like – for example no one read Peter Esperanza, Brendan Kelly, Letty Batista or Dustin Carlson,(to name a few there are so many  more..)  and those are some good books for my preservice audience.  However, in the end their choice was important for me both to learn what mattered to them and to give them ownership.   Also it seems there are books that I know that are out there do not show populate the ADE directory in iBooks – different Apple ID maybe?  (For example Letty, Samantha and Jim ‘s heart book which is published under UGA – https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-heart-lungs-corazon-y-pulmones/id1047843039?mt=11 )

Here are some of the books
I did not get an exhaustive list,(and I fudged the titles a bit as I went – my apologies but use the links)  but here are some of the good ones that students really liked.. If you are not checking out Apple Distinguished Educator books on the IBooks store, you should be.

Mary Kemper is a Math Rockstar !  I have had several students create reviews of two of her books. what I really liked that is that elementary and secondary math minded students found stuff they liked.
Patterns – https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/patterns/id1195763478?mt=11
Photo Walks
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/photo-walks/id1193098306?mt=11

Bea Leiderman – Great story books with her bug photography My students really went to the Lady Bug and Aphids – They loved the independent nature of aphids – cuz they don’t need no man!
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-lady-and-the-aphid-a-tale-of-two-bugs/id898064625?mt=11

Rabbi Michael Cohen -Students Teaching Students  This sparked a good discussion on how to group students.   https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/student-teaching-students/id1081721908?mt=11

Mat Pullen – Engaging Parents – students liked this because they feel not especially well prepared.  They also loved Mat’s son in the pictures. https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/how-schools-can-engage-with-parents-using-technology/id1024718761?mt=11

Jodie Deinheimer -Middle School zoo book.  This was a favorite among all three classes. They liked that the students had made the book themselves and found it appropriate for elementary students as well.  https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/through-their-eyes/id1105593599?mt=11

Cathy Hunt – IPad Art – I had three really artsy students – all different majors and they loved trying out the apps and getting inspired about how they could incorporate art in the regular curriculum.  https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/ipad-art/id706608032?mt=11

John Neal Augmented Reality – This book was great because it made it seem approachable (which it is) and the students had ideas about using it AR right away and they tied it into IOS 11 and how you will be able to use AR tool kit.  https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/augmented-reality-a-teachers-handbook/id1074499012?mt=11

Joe Allen – this book was very popular because students were hungry for ideas to help students. While it is Aussie, it had some great overviews for the students to think about accessibility and easy to use apps. https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/technology-to-support-students-literacy-difficulties/id1068322814?mt=11

Jenny Graibec – Jenny is well known as an expert for kids with learning differences. Many of my students reviewed this book and she took the air out of my accessibility lesson. happy to have that happen.  Students were excited to try out the tools she talked about. https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/ican-with-ios/id1057967830?mt=11

Natalie Woodward  This is an international book and I don’t think I know Natalie.  but the book was called iFlipped and it really had students debating if flipped learning was a good or bad thing.  Fruitful discussion for sure. Many were unsure what flipped was.. so definitions were great.  https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/iflipped/id1097347389?mt=11

David Wingler – Gamification for Math.  This book was chosen often for a great cover and gamification. Students explored using this app and liked the idea.  It will be food for thought. https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/gamification-made-easy/id1052413867?mt=13

April Requard Keynote for storytelling. Students really enjoyed this book because of the showcase of student work and the creativity. It allowed me to talk about the updated vector shapes in Keynote which was a great teachable moment.  https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-key-note-to-storytelling/id1058989829?mt=11

Students used Educreations with screen shots to show assistive tech settings. 

Students used vending machine cheese its to show counting patterns. 

 

I flipped had students explore if flipped learning was “good’ 

Students Baiboard as a group presentation with questions throughout.

ISTE Stds for Admin Leaders Working Group

So this summer I got asked to be part of the ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education) working group to write the new administrator standards.

Honestly, I figured i was invited because I had been a bit of a pain over an older set of standards but I really thought it was a great opportunity so I decided to go with it..   I am so glad that I did..

First a shout out to Carolyn Skykora and Sarah Stoeckl from ISTE who organized the group and eat, sleep and think Standards all the time.

The group was diverse in background, experience and perspective. There were only two higher education people on it, an experienced school superintendent, principals, professional development leaders, and classroom teachers.   The mix of leaders was really great to represent urban and rural schools and different levels of technology adoption.

The whole group is comprised of the following educators:  https://twitter.com/DrTerriC/lists/iste-working-group/members  

(May I suggest if you are a twitter person, this would be a great list to subscribe to)

The process was well structured, ISTE had already done a lot of work to gather preliminary information at the conference and other visits and this combined with the group, we started to refine them into larger buckets.

Later in fall, a refined draft 1 will be available for public comment. Currently you can comment on the existing standards here.  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Admin1A  

So here are my thoughts on the process so far:

The refresh process – is a year long process.. so much public comment and experts – it emerges from the field.  I had thought it was more crafted, but from my experience so far, it seems to be very crowd sourced.

ISTE walks the walk,  I was impressed how we were using Google docs in a model style of work flow and an important part of our process.

I saw a lot of the themes I saw at the ISTE conference in San Antonio.  There were lots of conversations about equity, and adequacy, and the want to better involve higher education.   They also were very committed to the themes in from the Department of Education Office of Ed Tech prior to January 20th of this year..  if you are on board with those ideas – ISTE is worth paying attention to right now.  (Their new CEO and CLO are both former DOE Ed Tech leaders).

This was my first foray into national standards work and I was impressed that ISTE is interested in heaving an adequate shelf life and represent key ideas and not current trends or buzz words. This is both a blessing and curse – because we were engaged in a lot of forward thinking.. not today, but 5 to 10 years from now.. what will we be talking about?

Overall. even though I feel incredibly behind for being away from Oklahoma for 3 days, I feel that my time was well spent, I made some great connections, and I am excited to see where this process goes.

The most important thing that I can say is that I hope you will weigh in the standards discussion and contribute.  These standards can only represent the reality of the 20,000 members of ISTE if you make your voice heard!  I will make sure to share future opportunities for public comment.

The future tool kit for review can be requested from:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScYlxo3oho2ECcm1AoTeBC593WcjuBUB3bLcE3yjyls7hcBZQ/viewform  

You can lead the review in Draft One in your own community.