Category Archives: edtech

Blending Leadership – My reaction

So I always try to read something to get me thinking over spring break..  (I was not good about blogging last year but I read Most Likely To Succeed by Tony Wagner and College Unbound by Selingo – books I suggest to everyone)

So this spring break I read Blending Leadership by Reshan Richards and Stephen J. Valentine.

First, I should say that I know Reshan through Apple Distinguished Educators – we have worked on a few projects at the same time but don’t know each other very well.  He is well known for his company Explain Everything but I will say by reading this book, I have definitely developed a great respect for him, his blended perspective (industry, K-12 and higher education). 

He was talking about this book in Summer 2017 at ADE Institute and I bought it online but never read it but picked it up as my spring break book. I am really glad I did. 

The overall premise of the book.. is that modern leadership requires us to think about leading in both the face to face and virtual world and that acts of servant leadership exist in online too.   I took notes as  I read the book, so it may seem kind of stream of consciousness but let me share some big ideas.

Truly Blended Scholarship

What struck me first about this book was truly the blended leadership and blended information seeking that is both spoken about in the book and practiced in it. In a higher education position being active on Twitter and interacting with blogs is not rewarded valued and questioned from any of the reasons that are discussed in the book (no peer review, no editing). 

However this is how I learned much of what I do, and my Professional Learning Community is in Blogs and Twitter So I was really excited when I saw that kind of reading combined with the reading that I do and the people that I know including Anne Ottenbreit Leftwich, Peggy Ertmer and wCharles Graham, people that I know professionally or went to grad school with.  These are well respected educational technologists and the authors of this book did a great job of weaving peer reviewed research articles with writings from business, and even blog posts. (I personally loved that they talked about the Agile Manifesto as I got my SCRUM certification this summer)   This book is very appropriate for someone who’s a professor in Education who is also engaging in the PLN that teachers are.  In fact I am going to encourage some of our educational readers to read this book to think about their role in both face to face and online spaces as leaders. This book is great and perhaps necessary read as we rethink scholarship and its value in academia.. This book provides a good example that someone can be engaging in reading peer reviewed scholarship but can also be informed by blogs. Which I personally feel are growing in importance as I have had “albatross” articles that have taken years to publish while their findings leak relevancy as each month passes by.

Practice what you Preach –

There was a lot in this book about the behaviors and habits of effective leaders in the digital age.   Some of the better ones included:

Be open in your communication and share your personal networks when it matches shared interest.. (Ie.. Don’t tweet a bunch of stuff on High School calculus to your network if it is all kindergarten teachers – but totally cool to talk about human development as it affects all ages.. (My example)

Be open with your tech use and share your experiences and be a participant leader working collaboratively with your team. (ie.. practice what you teach)

Consider taking care of digital spaces as servant leadership – ie.. if you would not let trash sit in a hallway, why would you let a Google Doc become unwieldy with comments and strikethroughs.

On being a flexible leader and tech user

Don’t get caught up on the tools for one purpose – remain flexible and know that the tool you love today could be gone tomorrow.    Use the tools, but we willing to pivot if something better comes along or it not longer meets your needs.

I totally love how they deal with SAMR – it drives me nutty that people use it as a ranking for teachers, when it was not intended to be that way..  I always think about it as varied stimulus. We all had teachers who used worksheets all the time, and never let you create something, and another teacher who was all into creation, that you never got through content.   There is a balance, where scaffolded learning helps learners learn both facts but also apply them and create with them.

Overall Takeaways

A blended leader is open and flexible and pays attention to the people they work with and allow them opportunities to grow and lead. They maintain online spaces to free people up to be creative and productive.

They also unplug when needed – being online is a choice and people are still key to the process.

Blended leaders choose the use of technology when it serves them well and are intentional to promote their organizations and their organization’s mission.  I really loved how they talked about companies that we love for their clear communication of their mission and how they asked – why aren’t schools doing more of that?  There are some really good ideas how every teacher or faculty member can participate in this mission.(which is a growing shadow work required of faculty in these rough budget times)

(on a related note: I LOVED reading this as a purchase from the IBooks Store.. I was able to highlight and transfer my highlights to Notes easily which made writing this blog post easy (even when I was on a plane or without network connectivity)  I only wish my highlighted sections could be more easily shown as complete – but I love that it will align them to printed page numbers.

Also I read this book in about 5 hours – in two sittings – a quick read and very useful.

Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itun.es/us/D6epdb.l

 

 

 

 

 

Being Politically Active on Twitter

So this last few weeks, I have very politically active on Twitter.  and well, I am actually not going to apologize.

I think there are some serious things going down and we should use networks, especially as professors,  to educate and inform.

I really hope our legislators listen to their constituents because much damage is being done.  I elect an official to represent my community and our ideas not those of the party or personally held.  And even if I did not elect them – I respect their office and know that they were elected to represent ME.  As a citizen, who believes in democracy, I will participate. It is my responsibility to democracy..

I hope we can engage in a dialogue but if you don’t agree with my perspective and are not open to dialoguing, I completely understand and encourage you to unfollow.

I own my tweets and take full responsibility for anything I say, even as if I were yelling it from a bull horn.

Creating Innovators: Is it really about teacher behaviors?

I have been catching up grading this weekend and have been reading my 21st Century masters students discussion posts on the first two chapters of Creating Innovators by Tony Wagner.

As I have switched to badging in my undergraduate course, I am little bummed that their great ideas are trapped in the Janux learning platform because they have great ideas.  (In fact, I invite them to copy and paste their posts to this post as a comment if they want to publicly share)..  I will say that in Summer (their semester 2) they will start blogs and so we realize that their ideas won’t always be trapped behind a paywall.

So in the first two chapters of creating innovators – we begin to ask the questions about learners and what do they really need to be innovative.

One of my students, Laura – Came to an interesting conclusion: “I do not have to change everything I am doing I just need to be creative in how I teach my lessons. I think students should be asking and answering questions.” And that is true, it is as much about changing our own mindset as it to changing the lessons.  Monica builds on that idea when she said, “I don’t think we should limit ourselves to asking “Who” should be asking the questions about innovative education, but perhaps we should look at all how students will answer their own questions? How will we as educators respond to these questions and guide them in their journey to find their answers?”  In the end, great student centered teaching is not about the students, its about us breaking of the safe and traditional ways of teaching that we are used to, and forcing ourselves out of our teacher centered experiences, into student centered teaching behaviors.

So just after reading their responses, this popped in my twitter feed.  Sherratsam wrote a blog post about guiding students in innovative practices.  http://linkis.com/wordpress.com/rhUJz  He talks about the sweet spot when you get students to go further =when you get them to work on their projects and the teacher is there as a coach to push them further.  He finishes his blog post with  set of questions.  I view these statements as a generalized scaffolding that we as educators can use to think about our role in the classroom.

Copied and Pasted From the Blog Post:  For modern, student-centred, inquiry-based pedagogy to even begin to dominate our weekly schedules, we need to help our students go through the following process quickly enough to allow them the time to start doing and to be able to go into enough depth with that for genuine and powerful learning to come out of it:

  • help them understand the context of the learning
  • help them think about the context in diverse, rich and deep ways
  • help them filter all of that thinking in order to develop their own interest area and focus
  • help them figure out what they want to achieve within that focus
  • help them get started in order to achieve it

What strikes me about this, is the scaffolding that he is providing is really questions to ask yourself and your own teaching behaviors – Am I helping them  to better understand the problem and getting out their way to push them further.

I find that when I am trying to force myself into more student centered behaviors, I set prompts for myself in my teaching – little reminders to myself.

For example, when I am teaching in our innovative learning classroom – I find myself asking myself whenever I want to do a demo – Do I have to be the one showing this?  Could a student be showing?  I try to leave my iPad closed all hour – because I can walk my students through the problem..  and if I can’t, then I explain that to them..  (Ie.. I am not sure how to do this,  let me show you how I try to solve a problem like this..)

So the question I got from reading the blog and my student response to the first two chapters of creating innovators – what kinds of questions of could I ask to achieve the goals listed above?

 

MITE Conference

Last week I had the opportunity to attend the MITE Conference (http://mite2017.com ) which is Mobile Technologies in Teacher Education. This conference was started by Apple Distinguished Educator Sean O Gradaigh (Twitter @SeanOGraTek) – account at the it was normally in Ireland but now he formed a relationship with CalStateTeach and it was in the US.

This conference was fabulous for several reasons.One I got to see some great friends and mix practice and research.  Two,  it was in LA in January (JK.. ) Three – I got to interact with CalStateTeach which is one of the most innovative teacher education programs in the country.    Four – the speakers were fabulous, in Fact I am talking to Bill Rankin to bring him to OU.

The timing is great because I did not miss class. Next location is not announced but worth watching for.

Participated in my first Zoom Chat

 

Tonight I participated in my first Zoom Chat. I was not familiar with this tool and were some things that I really liked and some things I did not..

This was the event on Accessibility

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sevenzo-live-chat-accessibility-inclusion-social-justice-tickets-30890940635?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=estw&utm-source=tw&utm-term=listing

My experiences with Zoom

All speakers and participants were featured on the same level.  This inclusion made me feel really required to participate – and I had to be logged in and engaged. (This would be different than Firetalk where everyone presenting is at the top and users must use chat)

  1.  I was able to easily mute and unmute myself.
  2. My internet was not great, but I was easily able to both talk and type.
  3. Sound was good.
  4. Every participate was able to screen share – so for teaching it would be good.

I think the Zoom Meeting is a good possible solution for some of our online learning needs. From the participant end it was easy to use and even though I was on a sketchy connection, worked well and was easy to use.

The price was not bad, 14.99 a month to host up to 50 people. Also all chats could be downloaded to be archived.

https://www.zoom.us/pricing/?zcid=1291&gclid=CjwKEAiA79zDBRCgyf2FgeiY-CESJABzr0BMqlmOOpccps-8FnhTaGz3e4pe424zQ7Uo09Bl_4YHthoCNhXw_wcB

I spoke with some others who participated and they talked that they found it more reliable than Google Hangouts.    Since the talk I was attending was on Accessibility, I wonder if Zoom is more accessible than other tools? and what affordances it offers.

 

For the Program at OU that is looking for a blended approach,  Zoom might be a good solution.